Where Can I Use My Medigap Plan?

So, once you have a Medigap plan, or while you are comparing plan options, you probably still have questions. Where can you use this plan? Should you check your doctors to make sure that they take your company? Should you call every possible hospital that you may go to to make sure that you will not have a problem if/when you need to go there?

First and foremost, it is important to understand the standardization of plans. Every plan is completely standardized, as far as coverage goes. One Plan F is the exact same as another ‘F’ from another company. Likewise, the plans work in the same way, as far as where you can use them. This does not vary from company to company.

Here are a few important things to know about where you can use your Medigap plan:

  • Medigap plans do NOT have networks. You can go to any doctor/hospital that takes Medicare. Your doctor will not “take” or not take your Medigap plan. He will or will not take Medicare, and the supplemnet plans “follow” Medicare.
  • One of the major sources of confusion about this is that other types of plans do have networks. In particular, Medicare replacement plans (Medicare Advantage) are PPO and HMO type plans. These plans are all regional in nature, and all of these plans do have networks. In recent years, there has been much talk about doctors refusing to take this type of plan due to changes in reimbursement rates, etc. Do not confuse this talk with the actual Medicare Supplements (Medigap), which do not have networks.
  • Medigap plans are not regionally-based, they are national plans. No matter where you are in the country, or if you move to a new state, you can continue to use your Medigap plan in the same way. These plans are national plans, so nothing about the coverage changes in different places in the country. You can continue to use your plan as normal.
  • The best way to find out if you can use your Medigap plan somewhere is to ask them if they take Medicare and make sure that they understand that you have an actual Supplement plan (not Medicare Advantage).

If you have any questions about Medigap plans, how they work or using an existing Medigap plan, you can contact us on our website at Medicare-Supplement.us or toll-free at 877.506.3378.

 

 

Trackbacks

  1. […] One of the major sources of confusion about this is that other types of plans do have networks. In particular, Medicare replacement plans (Medicare Advantage) are PPO and HMO type plans. These plans are all regional in nature, and all of these plans do have networks. In recent years, there has been much talk about doctors refusing to take this type of plan due to changes in reimbursement rates, etc. Do not confuse this talk with the actual Medicare Supplements (Medigap), which do not have networks.Source: medicare-supplement.us […]

  2. […] One of the major sources of confusion about this is that other types of plans do have networks. In particular, Medicare replacement plans (Medicare Advantage) are PPO and HMO type plans. These plans are all regional in nature, and all of these plans do have networks. In recent years, there has been much talk about doctors refusing to take this type of plan due to changes in reimbursement rates, etc. Do not confuse this talk with the actual Medicare Supplements (Medigap), which do not have networks.Source: medicare-supplement.us […]

  3. […] One of the major sources of confusion about this is that other types of plans do have networks. In particular, Medicare replacement plans (Medicare Advantage) are PPO and HMO type plans. These plans are all regional in nature, and all of these plans do have networks. In recent years, there has been much talk about doctors refusing to take this type of plan due to changes in reimbursement rates, etc. Do not confuse this talk with the actual Medicare Supplements (Medigap), which do not have networks.Source: medicare-supplement.us […]

  4. […] One of the major sources of confusion about this is that other types of plans do have networks. In particular, Medicare replacement plans (Medicare Advantage) are PPO and HMO type plans. These plans are all regional in nature, and all of these plans do have networks. In recent years, there has been much talk about doctors refusing to take this type of plan due to changes in reimbursement rates, etc. Do not confuse this talk with the actual Medicare Supplements (Medigap), which do not have networks.Source: medicare-supplement.us […]

  5. […] One of the major sources of confusion about this is that other types of plans do have networks. In particular, Medicare replacement plans (Medicare Advantage) are PPO and HMO type plans. These plans are all regional in nature, and all of these plans do have networks. In recent years, there has been much talk about doctors refusing to take this type of plan due to changes in reimbursement rates, etc. Do not confuse this talk with the actual Medicare Supplements (Medigap), which do not have networks.Source: medicare-supplement.us […]

  6. […] One of the major sources of confusion about this is that other types of plans do have networks. In particular, Medicare replacement plans (Medicare Advantage) are PPO and HMO type plans. These plans are all regional in nature, and all of these plans do have networks. In recent years, there has been much talk about doctors refusing to take this type of plan due to changes in reimbursement rates, etc. Do not confuse this talk with the actual Medicare Supplements (Medigap), which do not have networks.Source: medicare-supplement.us […]

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